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HgTe as a topological insulator

Speaker: 
Laurens W. Molenkamp (University of Würzburg, Germany)
Date: 
Wed, 06/02/2013 - 11:00am to 12:00pm
Location: 
S13-M01-11 (Physics Conference Room)
Event Type: 
Seminars

Abstract

HgTe is a zincblende-type semiconductor with an inverted band structure. While the bulk material is a semimetal, lowering the crystalline symmetry opens up a gap, turning the compound into a topological insulator. The most straightforward way to do so is by growing a quantum well with (Hg,Cd)Te barriers. Such structures exhibit the quantum spin Hall effect, where a pair of spin polarized helical edge channels develops when the bulk of the material is insulating. Our transport data provide very direct evidence for the existence of this third quantum Hall effect, which now is seen as the prime manifestation of a 2- dimensional topological insulator. To turn the material into a 3-dimensional topological insulator, we utilize growth induced strain in relatively thick (ca. 100 nm) HgTe epitaxial layers. The high electronic quality of such layers allows a direct observation of the quantum Hall effect of the 2-dimensional topological surface states. Moreover, on contacting these structures with Nb electrodes, a supercurrent is induced in the surface states.

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